Do we snack because we are bored?

Several studies have shown that television watching makes you snack more, which is very dangerous for your waistline, while others have found no effect. Could this discrepancy be due to the content of the programmes? If so, choosing your programs wisely would help you to keep your weight under control.

© Kmitu | Dreamstime Stock Photos
© Kmitu | Dreamstime Stock Photos

It is possible that your mood, in particular your level of boredom, could influence how much you are eating. To check this out, Colin Chapman and his colleagues compared how much 18 normal-weight women snacked when watching an engaging comedy program, with what they ate looking at a boring lecture or reading a boring text. The snacks consisted of grapes and M&M chocolates.

The women snacked significantly less during the engaging television program than during the boring one or while reading the boring text. There was no real difference between the amount snacked while reading or watching something boring.

Previous studies have already shown that obese people tend to eat more when bored, but now more and more researchers think that everybody does so. Moreover, if Colin Chapman is right it would mean that being bored by other means than television watching (in this experiment: reading) is just as bad.

The researchers also noted that when bored the women snacked more on grapes than on chocolates. When captivated however, they had relatively more chocolate. They suppose that when the women had more time to choose, they went for the healthy option. Even so, they took in more calories than when they were captivated.

Of course, this experiment was conducted in a lab and the women might behave otherwise when at home. The researchers did not check what the women ate after the experiment and we therefore do not know if there was any effect on the size of their meal.

We do not know either what the women were used to do. Habits are powerful, and if you are used to snack while watching television or if you associate snacking with having a good time, you will find it harder to control it.

Even so, if you want to keep your snacking under control, you should avoid boring stuff… Alternatively, you could make sure that there are no snacks available when you have boring things to do, which is probably a more realistic solution.

References

CD Chapman, VC Nilsson, HA Thune et al. Watching TV and food intake: the role of content. PLoSOne. 2014; 9(7): e100602. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0100602. eCollection 2014.

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